I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The giant, 8 meters high statue of Stalin was erected in 1951 to commemorate Stalin’s 70th birthday. The statue was destroyed during the 1956 revolution and only the boots of Stalin survived. The replica of the boots is at the entrance of the Memento Park in Buda.

The monument was inaugurated in 2020, on the 100th anniversary of the Versailles Peace Treaty. I’ve been considering posting about this monument for quite a long time and the time has come to publish my opinion, as I’m getting a lot of question about it on my Virtual Tours.

As most of you know Hungary was one of the countries which were badly punished after WW1, we can discuss the fairness of the decision but it’s too late now, as it all happened 101 years ago. As a consequence Hungary lost 2/3 of its original territories and 1/3 of its ethnic Hungarian population. From the early 1920’s political leaders continuously searched for the revision of the treaty, that was actually one of the reasons why Hungary entered WW2.

The Versailles Peace Treaty is named Trianon Treaty in the Hungarian folklore, as the treaty regulating the new borders of Hungary was signed in the Trianon Palace of Versailles.

The memorial is dark and somber. I know that it’s not supposed to be joyful as it commemorates hundred years of grieving but I would be happier to see something a bit less depressing. It’s a 100-meter-long tunnel that goes under the ground. What I like about the monument is that you can see the name of each and every Hungarian village or town that has ever been part of our country. What I don’t like about it is that it’s a dead end, when you walk to the end of it, there is no option to go forward, you have to turn back. I’d like to think that my nation’s history is a canvas changing its colours and shapes continuously and we, the Hungarians are contributing to its actual form. Our history was not over in 1920. I miss seeing the continuity and the hope to move forward.

The memorial is at Kossuth Lajos square right across from the magnificent Parliament building.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

This is a beautiful but rather sad love story. You see Prince Buda and Princess Pest, divided by the Danube River. The statue is on the Gellért hill near the Garden of Philosophy.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

Another statue with a magical power, meet our Little Princess! She’s sitting near the Danube River at the Marriott hotel. She’s the one who can make all your wishes come true. Just stand in front of her, put your hands on her knees, close your eyes and make a wish!

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The Matthias fountain is at the Royal Palace of the Buda Castle district. It shows our great Renaissance king Matthias on a hunt. It also tells a love story about the king who was a true friend of ladies, join my Buda Castle walk to learn more!

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The Turul bird is one of the national symbols of Hungary, as it was a Hungarian falcon that had led our ancestors to the actual territories of Hungary in 896. The statue is at the upper station of the Buda Castle funicular.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The 0 km stone symbolises the centre of Hungary. It’s near the Buda side of the Chain Bridge, at the funicular. All the road distances in Hungary are measured from here.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The Fat Policeman, aka Uncle Karl is our dear friend watching tourists and locals walking around the neighbourhood of the St. Stephen’s Basilica. Urban legend is that if you rub his belly you won’t have any weight problem and can try all the delicious Hungarian dishes.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

This beautiful sphinx is guarding the entrance of the State Opera House on Andrassy ut. Why is she so special? Because it’s not a typical sphinx with the head of a woman and the body of a lion, but if you have a closer look you can see the she has breasts, too.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

Julianus and Gerhardus, Hungarian monks who travelled all the way to near the Ural Mountains in the 13th century to find Magna Hungaria, the territories where the Hungarians had lived before they started their migration to Europe and conquered the actual territories of Hungary.