I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The Matthias fountain is at the Royal Palace of the Buda Castle district. It shows our great Renaissance king Matthias on a hunt. It also tells a love story about the king who was a true friend of ladies, join my Buda Castle walk to learn more!

… and it breaks my heart. I realise it’s a very delicate situation and every country’s government is responsible for the measures they’re taking. But I’ve also seen how differently other governments are dealing with the pandemic and only few of them decided to say no to tourists, brave and enthusiastic travellers who, despite of the spreading of the virus were still considering visiting my Beautiful Budapest.

This is all over for now, indefinitely, for 1 or 2 months, we don’t know. I’ll of course continue delivering Virtual Tours for the time being but I’ll miss terribly the real tours, the real adventures and the real people I’ve had the chance to work with these last couple of months.

You’ll find below a gallery of stunning pictures taken by one of my travellers, Jessica with whom I’ve had the chance to explore Buda, Pest and the cute little town of Vác last week.

With over 100.000 Hungarian and international artworks from as early as the ancient times to the 18th century, the Fine Art Museum is probably the largest and the most comprehensive art museum of Budapest.

The building of Classical Revival style is from 1906, from the outside it might remind you of a Greek temple, actually, the tympanum on the main facade is the exact replica of that of a Zeus temple in Olympia, Greece. The interior is just as magnificent as the artworks on display, the museum was closed for renovation works for almost 4 years and both the interior and the outside regained their original splendour. My personal favourite halls are the Romanesque and the Renaissance Halls, wondering around the building is like a real time travel for visitors.

The collection of the museum has six departments: Egyptian Antiquities, Classical Antiquities, Old Master Paintings, Sculptures, Prints and Drawings, Old Hungarian Collection. For more information on the museum and opening hours, you can visit the museum’s official website.

I’ve decided to share this blogpost originally from 2016 because my experience is that the Buda Castle District of Budapest is the most popular choice for the virtual tours. Most of the attractions below are to be seen during the tour and I’m happy to discuss the special architecture, culture and traditions of this beautiful neighbourhood. Feel free to contact me for further details on live or virtual tours!

The Buda Castle district is the oldest part of Buda, many of the buildings are originally from the Middle Ages. Buda became the capital of Hungary by the middle of the 13th century, the castle and the medieval town were constructed in the top of the Castle hill.

I don’t want to disappoint you but The Castle district is not a real castle. The Hungarian Medieval castle, residence of many of our great kings, constructed in Gothic and Renaissance architectures was destroyed in the 17th century. Only some parts of it are accessible in the Budapest History Museum, unfortunately the rest of the castle rest in the ground now.

You can walk up the hill along the ramparts of the Medieval Castle to get to the 18th century Baroque Palace which houses the Budapest History Museum and the National Gallery. The cobblestoned streets of the historical old town of Buda lead you to the Matthias Church, one of the oldest churches of the city originating from the 13th century. If you have some time, you really need to climb the 197 stairs to the church tower from where you can have the best view over our beautiful city.

From the top of the Fisherman’s Bastion you can enjoy the panorama over the Parliament building and the Pest side.

Continue your walk in the civilian town, admire the unique architecture of the National Archives and wonder around the old Jewish quarter. Probably the most interesting fact about the distric is that there is a 12 km long underground cave and cellar complex underneath the Castle District. There are 2 museums where you can discover this unique labyrinth. The Hospital in the Rock was a military hospital during WW2 and a nuclear bunker during the Communist era. The Labyrinth museum is all about scary fun and you might also meet Dracula, the infamous vampire count.

I’d be glad to show you the famous attractions and the hidden treasures of the neighborhood, too, book the Buda Castle walk!

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The Turul bird is one of the national symbols of Hungary, as it was a Hungarian falcon that had led our ancestors to the actual territories of Hungary in 896. The statue is at the upper station of the Buda Castle funicular.

I’m starting a new series to introduce you the most famous statues of Budapest and some of the hidden gems, too. These are the beautiful monuments of Budapest we usually see on our walking or driving tours in Buda and Pest.

The 0 km stone symbolises the centre of Hungary. It’s near the Buda side of the Chain Bridge, at the funicular. All the road distances in Hungary are measured from here.

The golden age of the famous coffeehouses of Budapest was at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. However, we see now the renaissance of the coffeehouse and coffee culture. We try to see different coffeehouses on our foodie tours so that travellers can sample the best Hungarian coffee and cakes.

Book Café has always been a special place, hidden in a modern 20th century department store on Andrássy avenue. Unfortunately the building and the coffeehouse are both closed now and we don’t know yet when they reopen.

As of today there are 3892 COVID-19 cases in Hungary and 527 people died. This means that the numbers haven’t increased much since the restrictions were lifted about two weeks ago.

That’s again a very good sign showing that hopefully we might leave the pandemic behind us soon and we can start travelling again. Fingers crossed 🙂

It’s also safe to say that Hungary and the neighbouring countries were not as badly affected as other European countries, it might be safer to travel to Hungary than to Italy, France or England. And of course, private tours are much safer than any other group tour.

Restaurants and bars, most of the shops reopened but the touristy places are still deserted and it literally breaks my heart. It’s so sad to see that places that are usually packed with people talking a hundred different languages are practically empty even now.

I don’t know when travel bans will be lifted and when tourists can finally come to my beautiful Budapest but I’m very optimistic and excited. Also, I’m putting together the social distancing tours, they will be uploaded once travelling is safe again. In the meantime, I’m still offering my popular virtual tours.

We’ve been in self isolation for 9 weeks and I have to admit it’s a very long time. But it’s over for now, restrictions are lifted, shops, public areas, parks, restaurants and cafés reopened. We can even go to outdoor swimming pools, museums and the zoo, too. Social distancing measures will continue to apply and it remains compulsory to wear a mask in shops and on public transport in Budapest.

As of today the number of COVID-19 cases in Hungary is 3535 and 462 people died. These numbers are significantly lower than in many Western and Southern European countries, we can’t tell why but think it’s because Hungary was literally locked down very early, on the 16th of March.

We still don’t know when it will be safe to travel again but can’t wait to open our borders to all travellers when it’s safe again!!

Don’t forget, Budapest is waiting for you and of course I won’t stop offering virtual tours: